How to identify 18650 cell capacity by color / code and how to tell fakes from real – [En]


        Before anything, I’ll briefly explain what 18650 cells are and what uses they may have. I have worked a lot with 18650 cells and I used them for pretty much anything that needs power.
        Basically, they are Li-Ion cells, that means they have the same overall parameters as a now-days phone battery. Their nominal voltage is 3.7V or 3.6V, but this is not too relevant. What’s important to note is that they are fully charged at 4.2V and they are considered discharged at 3.3V. Overcharging or excessively discharging them will shorten their lifetime.
        The cells can be used for quite a lot of applications: flashlights, lasers, measurement tools, even power tools (but in this case some special ones are used that can provide higher current and have lower capacity – I will not discuss the tech details here). Practically, anything that used to be able to work with 3 AA/R6 or AAA/R3 batteries can be safely used with an 18650 cell. If the space conditions are met, it’s really good to have only one standard type of cell for anything. It’s very useful instead of having various sizes of rechargeable batteries.
        Now, to get to the point of the article: there are many dozens of types of 18650 cells that can be found in shops, on-line sites or laptop batteries. I will try to explain here how to find the correct capacity for the biggest 18650 cell manufacturers around. Note that ripping old laptop batteries is a good near-free way to acquire cells. Usually, you will find a dead pair, a good pair and 1-2 intermediary ones (assuming there are 3/4 pairs in the battery). Most of the time the cells that have 2V+ when ripped out can recover most of their capacity when charged, while the ones under 1V are no longer usable and will overheat if you try to charge them.
        There are 4 very big companies that produce (used to be) very good quality cells: Samsung, Sanyo, Sony and LG. And there’s also the 99.998% fakes called Ultrafire. Practically, all Ultrafire cells on the online market that state any capacity over 3000mAh are fakes. Since there are other fake cells with fake-stated capacity, I’ll tell you how to detect them too. Fist of all, they have stated capacities of over 4000mAh, which is not currently possible. The best confirmed capacity original cell at this point has 3400mAh. Second, their weight is lighter. Original cells are 45grams+. Fakes have mostly under 40g, and the worst quality ones are even 20g. Those have an effective capacity of under 500mAh, even if they state 4000mAh+ on the label.
        Now, for each of the 4 big companies I’ll tell you how to see what actual capacity a cell is. I’ll also post RGB values, since the pictures may not look 100% like the original.

        Samsung
        Most Samsung cells in circulation are kind of Cyan color (RGB: 80,255,255). Note that other smaller companies use this color, but only the Samsungs have Samsung written on them.
Here is the color I’m talking about – in this picture we have a 2000mAh cell. Same color can be found for 2200mAh (most common) and 2400mAh.
samsung2000
The 2000mAh ones can also be light blue (RGB: 40,200,255).
Light green (RGB: 15,240,115) is used by Samsung for 2200mAh and 2400mAh cells:
samsung2200g
The majority of the 2200mAh cells are Cyan, like the pic with the 2000 ones. The green version is the newer 2200 model.
Most 2400 mAh cells are DarkSkyblue (RGB: 0,120,240):
samsung2400a
The 2600 mAh cells from Samsung come in only one color so far – Ugly Pink (RGB: 255,128,255):
samsung2600
Note that it’s more pink/ugly when seen live.
Samsung also has 3000mAh cells on the market, which are not that ugly as the pink ones (RGB: 100,133,200):
samsung3000
Since for 2000,2200 and 2400 mAh cell things can get confusing when it comes to colors, the best way to identify capacity is from the end of the line number in the first text line on the cell (the row where it says 18650). As you can see in the pictures, that’s exactly what 20,22,24,26 and 30 mean – it’s the capacity tag for any Samsung cells. So there you have it, you can now identify any Samsung cell.

        Sanyo
Most Sanyo cells are RED (RGB: 255,0,0), or the new fakeRED (RGB: 255,0,64) that’s infested with blue (we’ll talk about that later). They are the most hard to identify overall.

This is how a real red cell suppose to look like (RGB: 255,0,0):
sanyo2000
The 2000mAh original ones are indeed red by any standards. The cap is white. So if it’s pure red ones it’s 2000mAh capacity. The newer ones were also fakered (RGB: 255,0,64), but the cap is still white.
Here they are:

The 2200mAh cells and above are fakered (RGB: 255,0,64). It’s hard to detect in a picture, but there’s a clear tendency towards purple for those.
sanyo2200
You can tell the cells that have 2200mAh capacity be the RED cap. Yes, the cap is true red, unlike the rest of the cell.
The 2600mAh ones are also fakered (RGB: 255,0,64), but those have cyan cap. Don’t get tricked by the red in the picture, it’s a lot more towards purple in practice:
sanyo2600

The new 2800 and 3100 capacity models are orange and purple, but I haven’t seen any yet, so I won’t post them yet.

The high power cells (like the high current 1500mAh ones used in power tools) have a pink or light blue cap.
So, to identify the Sanyo cell, you’ll have to use actual color nuance and cap color, since the series written on them are most of the time barely visible.
Still, I’ll list the known series so you know what’s what if you can actually read it from the cell:

UR18650EA 2350mAh High Drain
UR18650RX 2050mAh High Drain
UR18650W2 1600mAh High Drain
UR18650WX 1600mAh High Drain
UR18650A 2250mAh Standard
UR18650AA 2250mAh Standard
UR18650ZY 2600mAh Standard
UR18650ZT 2700mAh High Capacity
UR18650ZTA 3000mAh High Capacity

        Panasonic
They are part of the above, so I did not consider them a separate company.
Panasonic has 3 common cells in circulation.

The lime-green (RGB: 200,255,127) has 2250mAh:
panasonic2250

There is a 2900mAh cell that is ugly grey (RGB: 163,163,163) :
panasonic2900

Their newer blue-infested green (RGB: 0,255,127 ) cell has 3100mAh:
panasonic3100

        Sony
Sony are standard green (RGB: 0,183,0). All of them are the same green so we’ll have to identify them differently. The way to identify them is the G-number.
On the second line, the first number after the G is the capacity identifier.
Here’s the 2200mAh cell:
sony2200
Here we have the 2400mAh cell:
sony2400
And finally the 2600mAh one:
sony2600

As you can see, the 2000mAh cell is marked with G5, the 2400 one with G7 and the 2600 one with G8.
That’s how to tell them apart. There’s also another important difference for the 2600mAh cell: it’s case does not cover the bottom at all, unlike the 2200 and 2400 ones there it’s bent and covers about 1mm of the bottom part. I think 2400mAh cells do exist that have no bottom cover also, but are in significantly smaller number.

        LG
Last one in the big league is LG. In their case, the series on the cells are a big mess and will never make sense unless you search for them and even then you may not find anything relevant. But the good thing is that they can be identified very easy by color.
The 2000mAh cells are pale orange (RGB: 255,155,112); they can still be found around:
18650

The 2200mAh are grey (RGB: 172,172,183). They are still one of the most common LG cells:
lg2200

Probably the most used LG cell today is the 2600mAh one which is orange (RGB: 255,155,63):
lg2600

LG also has some new cells rated at 3100mAh (RGB 147,147,255):
lg3100
No, they’re not as ugly as the Samsung pink but not very pleasant to look at either.

As you see, the good way to identify LG cells is directly by color.

        So there you have it – each one has a trick: for Samsung you have to check the tag at the end of the line, for Sanyo the cap for Sony the G-spot and for LG just the cell color.

        If you have any unidentified cell, don’t hesitate to post a link with a picture of it and I’m sure we can find what’s with it.

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204 Responses to How to identify 18650 cell capacity by color / code and how to tell fakes from real – [En]

  1. Dan Foresman says:

    I want to thank you for this, it helps me choose the 18650 for many projects, and to build battery packs, one needs spot welding and hobby chargers. A bit of a leap, although the Chevy Volt used packs do tempt me still for the Ebikes…
    So, I have to buy accessories to go this way, and the counterfeiting has really concerned me, you have done an amazing thing to help people with this article. I’ll be back!

  2. Wasim iqbal says:

    very informative thx

  3. jhonn says:

    i need help to identify those batteries ….

  4. Eric says:

    Great article. You know your 18650’s.

  5. KAROL Struck says:

    Thanks for the info I was lost unfortunately there’s a lot of counterfeit out there and they just found out I have purchased counterfeit ones they were yellow and listed at 9900 milliamps hours I still can’t believe how much energy actually gets packed into the little batteries the projects I have in mind now for these little guys any word from making the battery for my friend scooter which always has a hard time starting I think these will do the trick even if they are counterfeit thank you again for all your help Yours Truly Carl

    • xaeus says:

      You may have been in luck and had some refurbished ones that would give 1600-2000mAh. Last yellow 9800 I measured did give 2000mAh which is excellent for a fake. Weight it, if it’s 43 grams+ should be a refurbished and have at least 1600mAh. If it’s lower than 40grams it’s certainly below 1000mAh.

  6. Martin Morris says:

    Can you please tell me what my cells are they are a yellow and i think there chinese in my 60 volt 20 ah e bike battery .thanks.

  7. PrashMotion says:

    I have found those four 18650’s in a power bank I bought. It died a couple of days later for some reason. The cells are healthy and have a capacity of 2.5Ah. But I can’t find out which brand they are. Here’s a link to a picture of them: http://imgur.com/a/p7EtC The powerbank btw cost about 25 bucks. And there are total 4 cells.

    • xaeus says:

      Those are cell made by a NOVA division of Shenzhen Nova Technology Co., Ltd,a company from Guangdong, China which makes some pretty nice car LED light systems. The cells suppose to be the equivalent of the LG 2500 HE2. They are designed for medium power use/ ‘vaping’ purposes.
      I have not made capacity tests on those models, but manufacturer states that discharge rate for them is 25A which is better compared to the original 20A HE2 LGs.
      Judging by the weight, they are original and should have near or the stated capacity. Probably your power-bank has electronics that failed.

  8. Michael Gray says:

    Can you help me identify these?

    Thanks!

    • xaeus says:

      If you’re referring to the blue ones in the middle, they are original 2200mAh manufactured by Chang Jiang BATTERY Co. Ltd. (Yangtze River), China, which is a very large manufacturer. They are comparable to the Samsung 2200mAh.

  9. Bob says:

    I need some help on mine INR18650PL 17c10 4.68w do you know the specs on these?

    • xaeus says:

      Those are high current 1300mAh cells. The original ones should be light blue. They are the equivalent of the Samsung INR 18650 13P.
      4.68Wh means relatively 1300mAh @ 3.6 – 3.7 V.
      P.S. What’s marked INR is a high current cell. IMRs are medium current and ICRs are low current high capacity (like notebook cells).

  10. Bob says:

    Yes they are light blue

  11. Bob says:

    Any way I can test the battery with out un soldering it. I have them out But they are machine soldered

  12. Bob says:

    Any possible way that it could be 4000mah 72wh

  13. Bob says:

    How about this is this 4000mah INR 18650hp-c16e 3.7v I can not seem to find them on the web

  14. Bob says:

    oops correction oh they don’t say INR they just say: li-ion 18650hp-c16e 3.7v but they are for power tools

  15. EK says:

    //s.imgur.com/min/embed.js

    These cells came from a high quality industrial product so they should be good quality but I cannot find anything online. Under the sleeve there is an etched code that says: CG – DG03D
    Thanks for any information you have. If the above image doesnt work, here is a link: http://i.imgur.com/vMmpvYZ.jpg

  16. Tim says:

    OP you are awesome, I have gained a good idea by only reading your article already. And to check my aftermarket Makita battery pack, I opened the case and the cell is light green with code ISR18650-A 17E, do you have any idea of the manufacturer and the cell capacity and performance?
    Many thanks.

    • xaeus says:

      HSB China, 1700mAh medium power. You can replace it with sanyos and sonys V3 of 2100-2150mAh (standard green color: ).

      • Tim says:

        Thank you so much xaeus. I am really amazed by how well you know the batteries 🙂 . Even google returns nothing relevant when I search the code.

  17. Bob says:

    INR18650PL 17c10 4.68wh I think these are fake also sold as 4000mAh but I think they are only 1300mAh Watch out for these

  18. Bob R says:

    Hello everyone, Is there such thing as a 12000 mAh 18650? if so, is this a good brand?
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/18650-3-7V-12000mAh-Rechargeable-Li-ion-Battery-for-LED-Torch-Flashlight-DP-/112227825769?fromMakeTrack=true
    Many thanks,
    Bob Rosedale, MD. USA

    • xaeus says:

      No, no such thing exists. The most high capacity cell up to date is 3700mAh. That thing probably is under 400mAh or so. Don’t buy such fake junk.

  19. d_t_a says:

    I would like to ask if 18650 #5, #9 and #10 on the image below can be identified?
    (#5 is marked “ICR18650NQ” but I can’t verify if it’s a genuine Samsung; #9 has no markings at all; #10 is a 2000mAh 18650 that’s only labeled with a local battery shop’s name)

  20. xaeus says:

    ICR-18650 NQ-SP could be 2600 mAh Emmirech’s, in theory equivalent of the 2600maH pink Samsungs. Since it does not say NQ-SP it’s probably faked. 9 and 10 are rebrands/refurbishes – it could be anything in them.

  21. Do you know what these are? From green works 40v battery pack.

    http://imgur.com/QqCaTfy

  22. xaeus says:

    It’s a good cell, most lots are very reliable. It’s normal current (2A), not medium or high. I use these and Samsungs 2600mAh pinks for laptop cell replacement. They proved more lasting than the Samsungs.

  23. OLUSOLA MAXRAY says:

    Xaeus ,Your insight,response,knowledge, is fantastic..!!. Thank you I have learnt enough here.

    • Jim Silva says:

      Thanks for the info. Did some review and although the weight ratio looked ok for 2500mAh, there were some bad reviews of the cells.
      Heavier ones from DHGate

  24. Jerry says:

    Hi Xaeus, can you identify the cells in this picture? They’re part of a 52 volt 60 Ah ebike battery. Can you recommend a suitable replacement with a higher capacity? Thank you

    • xaeus says:

      The INR marking means they are (or suppose to be) high current. 14Wh means an equivalent of 3700mAh, which seems too much for INR. So the markings are kind of inconsistent.

      How many were in the pack? Judging from that, we can determine the capacity per cell. 52V would imply 14 cells in series, but were there more pairs ? 60Ah sound weird, would imply 20 or 30 pairs, so I doubt that’s correct…that would be the size of a car battery.

    • john says:

      it dousnot say 14w
      it says 8.14w

  25. Michael says:

    Hey Xaeus! I am looking to replace 4 cells in a bike headlight battery pack they are Samsung labeled ICR18650-26C Clearly they are 2600mAh cells but, that C concerns me. It doesn’t look like the ICR18650-26C cells are available any more. I do see that Samsung ICR18650-26F cells are readily available and appear to have identical specs. Do you know what the C & F designations indicate? Very helpful post! Thanks.

    • xaeus says:

      They are identical is specs but differ in internal chemistry.

      For example, As and Cs use the standard classic ICR Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) while Fs use a newer Mixed Co/Ni/Mn like (but not identical to) INR’s LiNiMnCoO2.

      Practically, in your case, it’s less likely that they heat-up. Overheating too fast when drained is the reason they gave up manufacturing Cs in favor of Fs.

  26. Dave says:

    Can anybody recognize these 18650

  27. Dave says:

    Can anybody recognize these,Awaiting delivery of these(10,000) and was just hoping someone might have an insight
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1IS0nwJKqiCaXqZDtUebcUf9PEo_Rumt6

    • xaeus says:

      They look like Sony, but you’ll have to post a pic with what’s written on one of them to identify an exact model.

  28. Hi all, can you please identify a 18650 cell for me? The Code on the metal is JSE9 49M51 VCC1 VCC1. There is no wrap on it.
    Thank you very much from Germany.

  29. ALEX says:

    Hi, do you know if the 2600mAh Samsung are still making? or they stopped the production?
    Do you know what is the expensive comparing the same 2600mAh,Samsung or LG?

    • xaeus says:

      Yes, they still make 2600mAh, the current model is 18650-26F. Prices between LG and Samsungs of same capacity is nearly the same, it’s the discounts you can get that make the actual difference.

      • ALEX says:

        Thank you very much Xaeus!! 🙂
        Do you know more website to learn more about battery cell? and get the real price for a single cell?

    • xaeus says:

      Pricing varies a lot, but original cells are not sold at junk price. Original cells usually start at $10 upwards.

  30. deep says:

    Could you suggest me which battery is preferable to replace Sanyo UR18650A means same characteristic with Sanyo UR18650A as Sanyo UR18650A is not available in our area and it will be used with other 5 Sanyo UR18650A battery in laptop battery.

    • xaeus says:

      Please check the second line starting with ‘G’. Usually, those are 2200 to 2600 mAh, so a Samsung ICR18650-26F should do well as replacement for any of them.

  31. rob says:

    Is this a knock off 18650? Its in a flashlight and not sure how to find it

  32. Can you tell me anything about the following.

    I just received a new laptop battery that I took apart. The 9 cells have the following written on them “+ FP 18650 1800mAh 170918”. The cells have green packaging. I thought I was receiving 9 2600mAh cells based on what the laptop battery packaging indicates.

    I’m not able to share a picture of my setup, there’s no option for photos or files in the comments.

    • xaeus says:

      FP are made by Shenzhen Vodno Technology Co., Ltd. They are considered of good quality. What was on the laptop packaging (Voltage, Wh) ? It’s strange because those are made for vaping (sub-ohm category).

      • It said, “Model 1526 Rating: 11.1v 7800mAh/87wh” on the outside of the laptop battery. There’s more written on the side of the bms, “1526 11.1v6.6AH, 17.9.12 366000”..which is completely different than the laptop and the cells. The listing on ebay said it was 9 cells, so I thought it would be 2600mAh per cell but it was 9 cells at 1800mAh which was an unexpected disappointment.

        I would like to build a battery bank (~ 2 kW) out of these cells but not if they aren’t going to last for a significant amount of time and not if I can’t get them at the right price. I don’t really know the positives and negatives of the higher and lower capacities. Do they have a decent number of cycles? Do you have any advice for this type of setup? I’m obviously working in unfamiliar territory.

        What does sub-ohm category mean?

      • xaeus says:

        Maximum continuous current should be 10A, since it’s a vaping cell, assuming it’s original and full capacity. As for the cycles, only time will tell. Sub-ohm means it’s a high current cell that can have a consumer that has an internal resistance of under 1 ohm, which many vaping devices have. Such a small resistance value would cause a normal classic cell to overheat and even set on fire.
        As for the bank, it really depends on what you want to use it for. What voltage do you need and what is the constant consumption/discharge (wh) ?

      • Do you know how I would find the maximum continuous current for these cells?

  33. OLIVIER KELLER says:

    Hello could you help me to identify a battery I have in a rechargeable lamp? on the barcode is written: INR18650HH DL-14L09 . color is light blue.
    thanks much!

    • xaeus says:

      It’s a high current model of 1400mAh similar to INR18650PL-1300. You can replace it with a Samsung INR18650-13Q or 15Q or the sanyo 1500mAh equivalent.

      • OLIVIER KELLER says:

        Hello again
        I cannot find the INR18650-13Q or 15Q or sanyo 1500mAh , but I found:
        INR18650 30Q (litokala or varicore)
        sanyo 18650 ur18650w2 (masterfire)
        samsung INR18650 25R
        samsung INR18650 26F
        INR18650 30B
        INR18650 30Q

        that would help greatly!
        Thanks
        Oliver

    • xaeus says:

      You could use INR18650 30Q, they will give you double the capacity and a little less current.

  34. OLIVIER KELLER says:

    thanks much!

  35. Moses says:

    Hi,I have harvested some batteries from laptop battery pack, never found any thing like your site,I will go home and check each and individual battery and will try to name it if not will post the pics and request you.
    Hats off to you for the knowledge you possess and the way patiently handling all queries.

  36. I kinda just read your stuff and I was wanting to make a charger for my extracted sets, so I wanted to know how much is the capacities of the batteries I have.

    It’s part of a power bank my neice have left me, and some of these my friend gave randomly. They all look very similar with a pink (ugly?) colored “skin”, but I have two sets (ie, two printed patterns). They all state 18650 so I kinda assume they are similar on that matter as well, but what I can’t get is the mAh of these. I need it so I can build a proper charger. Also, does it indice how many cells they contain inside? I’ve been coming across terms like 1s, 2s, and 3s but I’m not sure if it means the cells INSIDE each battery or the cell is THE individual battery.

    Not sure how to post a pic in this site (first timer here) but here’s a link to it:

    https://imgur.com/aUADAFI

    BTW, nice job on having this page. Great help to a lot of people especially those who like to get hands-on on things.

    • xaeus says:

      Hello. You don’t need to know how many mAh they have in order to build a charger. However, they look like Samsung 2600mAh from the pic you posted.

  37. Viktor says:

    Hi! I am really wondering how the battery codes can be interpreted. E.g. I am looking for a replacement of Samsung 18650-13P, I have realized what 13 means – 1300 mAh, however P is a mistery. I have seen that Q should be ok for replacement, but is it for real? Also 25Q is ok if I want to have higher capacity?
    I could use a manufacturer code translator.. do you happen to have such info?

    • xaeus says:

      Those are actually used to difference between tech-ups, so they are fully compatible with each other. In your case, P, Q and L are fully compatible.

  38. Sebastian says:

    Inside a 6000mah Makita aftermarket battery there are green cells with ISR18650-A 17h printed on them, 3×5 config. I suppose they are 1700mah giving a total of 5100mah. But are they high-drain or not? Bought from Ali so I guess I am not surprised if not as advertised

  39. xaeus says:

    Those are CEBAs. Yes, they are high drain. You can safely replace them with samsungs 1500mAh (15Q).

  40. sebastian says:

    Thanks for your help. They are 1700mah right? So 3*1700mah total?

  41. Sebastian says:

    How about this one then, inside yet another Ali aftermarket Makita 18V li-on battery with stated 6000mah using a 2*5 configuration implying cells of 3000mah capacity.
    HT18650AE1GIAE

  42. MLopes says:

    hello xaeus,
    thank you very much for a great post. very informative.
    i’m thinking about buying this caving light (duo version): http://www.phaethoncavinglight.com/phaethon.html
    because i’ll use it for caving but also for cavediving i need very reliable cells but also need them to give me as many hours of light as possible.
    i’m looking for no less than the state of the art 18650 cell for this purpose. which one would you recommend? any brand, maker or model is ok since i have none.
    (i was looking to panasonic but they have so many “models”, “b”, “bd”, “be”, “a”, “f”, etc, that i got completely lost).
    thank you! 🙂

    • xaeus says:

      For LED lamp use, most clients were very satisfied with the 2200,2400 and 2600mAh green Sony cells. Even after years they still maintained capacity well. For very high capacity Panasonic would be a good way to go. The ratings are iterations of the manufacturing tech-ups. NCR18650A was the initial type of base cell,then it was followed by NCR18650B, which is the same tech used in Tesla Car batteries. Two widely-available variations of the NCR18650B are the NCR18650BD (grey) and NCR18650BE (light green). The BE has a little higher capacity and a way faster charge time (5:8 compared to the BD) so this would be the proper choice. I had no opportunity to mass-test Sony cells higher than 2600mAh (normal drain, high capacity). The high drain models (V1s, V3s, VTC6) proved to act a little strange from a lifetime perspective (some experienced sudden death while others were long-lasting). So I’d stick with Panasonic 3200mAh BE or the older 3400mAh B.

      • Miguel Lopes says:

        thank you very much for your reply and explanations.
        a friend also suggested me the LG 18650 MJ1 3500mAh (green). do you have any experience with those? what do you think about them?
        do you know where to buy panasonic or lg or whatever genuine cells in europe? a secure place that does’nt sell fakes

      • xaeus says:

        I intensively tested LGs of 2000,2200,2400,260, 2800 and 3100 mAh. Overall, I was less satisfied with their durability compared to Sony or Sanyo. That doesn’t mean you can’t get a good lot. As for getting originals, mostly the shops that sell many types of batteries (are specialized on this) don’t afford to cheat on their customers. the highest chance to get originals is if you rip them off power tool batteries or original laptop batteries.

  43. Fangface69 says:

    I need help identifying this battery. It has a gray wrap with
    INR18650-2600A
    +ROOFER 2600mAh 9.62WH HIP
    printed on it. Would like to know who made it and its stats besides the mAh like what kind if amps it’s rated for and uf its high drain or not.

    • xaeus says:

      A picture of it could help. Roofers are manufactured by Shenzhen Co. Ltd. , China and are quite similar to the LG equivalent of the same capacity rating. INR means it’s a high drain.

      • Fangface69 says:

        Thanks! Sorry I had no idea how to get a pic posted on here. But you’re info helps alot.

  44. Sebastian says:

    Hello again.
    Just received an aftermarket Hitachi 18v battery from Ali.
    It is stated to be a 5Ah 90Wh battery, although the label also states EBM1830 which I guess is a Hitachi model no for 3Ah. As it is from China, who knows what capacity cells are actually inside. So I opened it.
    The cells are blue, marked with manufacturing date, preceeded with a string of something that ends with 000D.
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1JI0i5OnDZdUqDgvLdVxykXx35UBoNJFQ

    Brand and capacity possible to predict based on this information?
    /Sebastian

  45. Michael Gray says:

    Hey all, this is a fantastic thread! If I may, I’d like to share a database of 18650 cells: https://secondlifestorage.com/celldatabase.php It’s fairly extensive but far from complete. Anyone who has time or interest is welcome to share their info with the group. (You probably have to register first though.) And all are welcome to see the info that we do have. No registration should be needed for just viewing the database. 🙂

    • xaeus says:

      Hail. I’ve seen it a while ago. Good job centralizing that ! When checking a few months back, I have discovered some cells not in there, I’d be happy to share them with you. I’ll just have to find some time to compare with my own DB (maybe take some pictures). I’ll e-mail you (or register and post if needed) the colors and cap colors. I think color naming should be a little more detailed (’cause there are many types or red, green, blue and gray-based cells). It would be nice to keep that updated.

      • Michael Gray says:

        I’d be happy to share your info if you’d rather email me than register. I’ll make sure you get the credit. Speaking of which, I’ve only sent in a few photos to the database. The real work has mostly been done by the other Mike, who actually administrates the website. 🙂

    • xaeus says:

      It could really be useful to have the mAh ratings in the main table. Much easier to follow and update.

      • Michael Gray says:

        I’m not sure why, but the admins discussed that a while back, and decided not to put capacity on the main page. There is a filter for minimum mAh though. A lot of the cells listed are missing datasheets, so the rated capacity is not known. That might be a factor.

    • xaeus says:

      I’ve send you some by e-mail.

  46. mohamed alaa says:

    really thank you very much, really you are a great person

  47. Rahul says:

    Hi,
    I was wondering if there are any stability, safety and performance issues inside a cell when the capacity is higher? For instance, it is said that 3Ah (84 grams) is the ideal capacity for a LiFePO4 26650 cell, but some companies are manufacturing 3.2Ah (85 grams) and 3.4Ah (86 grams) cell in the same 26650 size and the weight. Their datasheet shows the same discharge and charge values. Is it a good idea to use for high rated cells in this case? The application here is mainly Solar Energy Storage and EVs. Also this question is with reference to the fact that no new invention has been done increase the gravimetric and volumetric density in the LiFePO4 chemistry since the industry is now working to transition to NMC.

    • xaeus says:

      Hello. There can be a difference in the technology itself. You can make different capacities at the same weight; as technology evolves, optimizations can increase capacity. But…companies can also cheat on this. While a classic Li-Ion cell was considered depleted at 3.3V, now-days companies state that their depletion voltage is 3.0 or other less than 3.3V values, therefore artificially inflating the value of the actual capacity. For example, A 3100 mAh considered depleted at 3.3V can be declared as a 3400mAh battery if the depletion value is stated to be 3.0 V. Neutrally speaking, this is cheating. The battery will fail to provide a good current in this situation when at low voltage. So you have capacity left, but it’s useless. This ‘cheat’ may work for general use, but will not work for batteries used by tools that mostly draw current near the maximum supported by the battery. In your case, solar energy storage is not a high-current use situation unless it was badly designed (on the drain/consumption side), so it would be safe to use anything, but you may find out that in some cases that the practical time the batteries last will be actually identical for various close capacity values.

  48. Rozi says:

    Hi! First thank you for your post it’s verry helpfull.
    I just took apart an old laptop battery and find 6 cells inside. All seems to be working well, voltage is good and everything. Is it posible to identify them? I see they are LG ‘s but are th3y those LG’ s 3100mAh – ugly pink?

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1KVQQmNXIVkWktuCJuBB–FVEjvdyce1c/view?usp=drivesdk

    Thank you in advance!

    • xaeus says:

      I requested access to g-drive to see your link. For making things easier, everyone should use free image hosting sites, those don’t need additional approval steps.

      • Rozi says:

        Sorry, didn’t know how else to post picture 🙂
        Hope you got the approval. Will try to change hosting site.

    • xaeus says:

      Pic worked. No, those don’t look like the 3100mAh ones. From what notebook was the battery ? They may be a more rare version of 2000-2200mAh.

      • Rozi says:

        HP Probook 4710S was the laptop.
        I charged them and they seem to be working in my flashlight. Testing right now how long they will last in it. 🙂
        Thank you!

      • Rozi says:

        Oh, sorry. HP Compay 7400 was the laptop model.

    • xaeus says:

      Yeap, I was right, those had 4000mAh batteries which means that the cells are 2000mAh, which is actually luck because the 2000mAh cells are among the most long-lasting cells ever made.

      • Rozi says:

        Yaay, good news for me then 🙂
        Thank you very much for your help!

  49. Nikola says:

    HI, need help for batteris ISR18650-C 17H what is capacity of them.
    Thanks

    • xaeus says:

      Where do you have them from ? Do post a picture if you can. Those appear to be made by HSB China, 1700mAh medium power. H-series are newer that E an F models.

  50. Nikola says:

    From Amazon UK as replacment battery for tool,
    here is link for cell: https://imageshack.us/i/pmS3sQgQj

  51. Nikola says:

    was 5AH

  52. BBBB says:

    This is the most helpful 18650 link.Thank you ,keep up the GREAT work

  53. Mario friend says:

    Help with identifying. orange fast 18650-3000mah vol3.75v-4.35v. I wan trying to mostly identify the amp for the batteries to safely use them

    • xaeus says:

      A picture would help, but if they are rated up to 4.35, most likely they are normal current so that means it’s not recommended to exceed a 1A continuous discharge. Simply said, don’t exceed 5 Watts per cell consumption.

  54. David Weiss says:

    I recently purchased a battery pack for my ebike and I can’t figure out what cells were used. I was told that they were panasonic, but I don’t think so. I need help identifying them. They are pink with a long bar code. The numbers on them are SINC ISR 18650 25A18109022562

  55. Aswin G Sharif says:

    Much appreciate for clear explanation!
    It help to be cautious when buying used 18650 (less than USD1 each, just for mini electronic projects, not for electric bike tough).
    there are so many sellers who claim their cells are above 2000 or 3000 mAh, so now I can validate their claims…..
    Thanks!

    • xaeus says:

      A cell above 2000mAh true capacity cannot cost under $1, that should be clear for anyone. There are cells at even 1/3$ in my country but they are of 400mAh even if over 3k is written on the label. For bike projects you can use standard cells in the range of 2000-3100mAh (they can be obtained from recycled laptop batteries).

  56. Darren says:

    Can you ID these guys? The blue one is from an unknown source. The copper/orange battery is one of two from a 2200 mAh powerbank. Cost for powerbank is $2.50 from Frye’s. Wondering if it’s 1100 or 2200 each. If 2200 each, then $1.25 per battery is a pretty good investment. However, the batteries are shipped/stored at 0v. I charged both up to 4.2v, but not sure how long they’ll hold the charge.
    https://imgur.com/a/mYAzw

  57. xaeus says:

    Both seem to be generic re-packed cells. You most like will have to measure capacity to see how good they are. If the powerbank had 2200mAh rating and 2 cells, it means the cells are 1100mAh which is mostly the average area where both the blue cells and most of the ones marked with YN- are situated.

  58. Kakaroto Fracassado says:

    Hi, xaeus. I cant identify the brand of these cells since they have nothing written in them. The package says ¨Samsung¨. Can you please take a look?

    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ryojH7Kq7QFPZ28eL2K1XcK4DwZXdcfQ
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1CnTGLTZY87kYgkzPfxgmPV0U8mN3ohrT
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Et1HYFXe9mKWcxKWyr7lABOnWU54inOm

    Btw, if you know anything about the circuit (BMS/PCB) under the cells that also would help me.
    Thanks.

  59. vikas kumar says:

    can we repair laptop battery by using 18650 rechargeable taken from power banks?
    bcz 13000 mah power bank costs 1200 rupees (5 lg made18650 battery) and if i will purchase separate battery from market then it will cost much more.

    my concern is that is there any difference between batteries used in laptop and power banks.
    bcz original laptop battery will cost almost triple the cost of power bank. and the capacity will also increase by using the battery taken from power bank.

    • xaeus says:

      It depends on the quality of the cells in the power bank. Cheap power banks may have junk cells. A true 13000mAh power bank should have 5x2600mAh cells. If it actually does, then certainly with these 5 cells you can replace 4 cells from any known laptop. If the cells are repacks/fakes, you’ll get way less capacity and they may not even work in a laptop (like ultrafires).

      • vikas kumar says:

        first off all thank you for the reply.
        actually i have purchased a power bank…ambrane… that uses 5 lg made batteries(2600 mah each) so can i use these 5 cells to repair my laptop battery?
        i am asking bcz every power bank manufacturer tells that it will last 500 to 700 charge discharge cycle but an original laptop battery last way more than these average 600 charge discharge cycle(average 2 to 3 years.).
        bcz if i will charge my laptop 3 to 4 times a day then it will last hardly 5 to 6 month.
        so what should i choose?
        1..i should repair the battery by using power bank battery by investing 1000 rupees. or
        2.. i should invest 3 to 4 thousand on buying the original laptop battery.

        and no one knows that the so called original battery will last or not like the battery that came with the laptop(hp elitebook 8470p) .

    • xaeus says:

      If the pack has high quality cells there’s no reason not to used them for the battery repair. Put those new cell into the laptop battery and the old laptop cell you can check how many of them are still good (usually a part) and use those for the power pack and still have a usable power pack, even if of lower capacity. Can you write the model of the laptop you want the battery upgraded ?

      • vikas kumar says:

        Thank you again for the reply
        The laptop model is HP Elitebook 8470p

    • xaeus says:

      From what I recall those models can have 9 6 or 3 cells, so for a 9-cell main battery or 6-cell you’ll need 2 packs to completely replace the cells (unless you got the light version with 3 cells). They also support connecting and external secondary battery.

  60. David says:

    Hi Mate, can you help me identify these LG Cells:
    Color turquise, Ring: white, written: LGDB118650 H3222904047 EK172D8B1
    Have 4 of them, propably they come from an laptop accu.

    Thank You!

    • xaeus says:

      Hello. If it’s the cyan-colored one, it’s 2600mAh. They support a little higher current drain than average (up to 5A compared to up to 2 for most others).

    • xaeus says:

      Depends on the power consumption of the device you want to use them in. If it does not exceed 15W per the 4 cells you should be fine.

  61. David says:

    Yes they are cyan colored, thank you. Can I charge them with 1C?

  62. OSCAR RICARDO VELEZ says:

    i NEED FOR lectric bike a battery pack with samsung type batttery 18650 to give 36 volt , 10,4 amph and 300 watt. How made the pack and how many cells need.

    • xaeus says:

      36 volts requires 10 cells in series (and you will need to charge them to 42V for a full charge, meaning you need a charger that provided more that 42V). Considering you need 300W, and that a samsung cell has 14 to 20 W usually, you can obtain your power requirement with 2 or 3 pairs. But that will give you a relatively low capacity for electric bikes. It’s best that you use 5 pairs of 10 cells in series (that’s 50 cells in total).

      • Ano-name says:

        Hi, i have blue/cyan 18650 cell (like the first samsung photo in your post)
        It is write : ASO FN11002EH 400452 on it with a code barre under. Can you tell me wich brand and mAh this cell have ? Btw thanks for that post

      • xaeus says:

        The are made by Shenzhen, China. Should have 2200mAh capacity, like the Samsungs 22s.

  63. Zaahir Parker says:

    Hi there. I have a clear wrapped battery but I have no clue which it is. I want to use the battery for vaping. The only markings are printed on the actual battery itself.
    J5H2
    42U21
    which is printed below each other and elsewhere it has R4D2 printed
    On the positive terminal there are 3 prongs connecting.

    • xaeus says:

      Can you post a picture ? The markings are not too relevant. For example, R4D2 is a water resistant steel specification.

  64. Danko says:

    Hello there,
    I harvested some cells from my Acer laptop battery, and didn’t find anywhere that mark.
    They seems to be Sony, but I did not manage to find a second-line tag anywhere.
    SE US18650GR
    T 6F1250(or Q)J25B

    • xaeus says:

      Hello, they are certainly Sony. What capacity rating did the acer battery had ? We can tell the cell capacity from that.

      • Danko says:

        Hi,
        good idea lol
        I think it was 4400mAh
        They was two in parallel in 3s (six of them).
        This means each should be 2200mAh, great!
        Thanks. Second line mark was very confusing.
        Anyway, xtar vc4 coming soon, and I will measure what left from their capacity.
        Best regards!

    • xaeus says:

      Yes, if the pack was 4400mAh, the cells are definitely 2200mAh, which are very long lasting, I still have plenty in use. However, the 2200 marking should of started with G5, not 6F. Maybe they are a more special model.

      • Danko says:

        Thank you man, you are very kind.
        Poor battery back 🙂 It was dead after using brand new laptop for a few months. Finally after 9 years I brake it apart and as supprise found 6 cells all good. Every one was about 4.1V.
        Must be electronic in battery pack.
        🙂

  65. Loren says:

    Hello! Thank you so much for this post and the help you give others. Can you ID these cells?
    https://ibb.co/niy6RK
    Cheers!

    • xaeus says:

      They’re most likely re-brands usable for flashlights. They may have 2200mAh.

      • loren says:

        Thanks. These are in a large 7p13s generic pack I inherited with 3 dead groups. hopefully can rebuild the pack to a 7p10s. Cheers.

  66. Roy Langoen says:

    Hi! Why are most of the 18650 batteries flat on top? My device, a door bell with camera, needs a higher top battery due to the design inside the case. Cheers – Roy

  67. JM says:

    Hi, really nice post!!
    Could you help me to identify these cells? Got from a broken Mobile Powerlive+ charger
    http://imgur.com/velGZN8
    Thanks in advance
    JM

  68. Lada says:

    Hello everybody – i would like to ask about his one:
    https://imgur.com/a/B7S0xai
    Is it fake or not? I never seen similar Panasonic cells like this one.
    I tested capacity a it shows 730mAh/2.5W. But I don´t know how old are they …
    Thank you for help.

    • xaeus says:

      Hello Lada. The cell label looks authentic. It is a Panasonic 18650 cell, rated 1800mAh. Your tested capacity is like that probably because the cell is very old.

      • Lada says:

        Thank you for your reply. I have got them by friend, i tested many of them but capacity of 99% cells is bad (from 0,3Ah to 0,7Ah). Probably are very old if you say – it´s not fake.
        I make my own powerbank from grey 2900mAh Panasonic cells and it works great … so i was surprised from results of testing.
        Anyway, thank you for identification, you are the best – this page is very usefull – keep going…

  69. Lars says:

    Hi Xaeus,
    Thanks for sharing your extensive knowledge! I have read the whole forum but can’t see that you have covered my question. I believe it may be of interest to others with similar applications.
    I have Garmin navigation chart plotter that needs new cells. The original cells are Samsung ICR18650-24B. The battery pack would typically power the unit up to 7-8 hours => average power consumption aprox. 0.35A.
    What would be the best cell choice today if I want to have long running times on battery and low self discharge when not in use?
    Tip:
    The battery control circuit on many Garmin battery packs don’t take charge if the battery runs to low. The unit usually shows “Battery missing”. A simple work-around is to remove the glued cover and stick two needles thru the battery pack wrapping (NOT the cell wrapping) to reach the poles. Now apply suitable charge current/voltage for a 15-30 minutes. If the cell is healthy it will now have charged enough to give >3.7V and show up on the “radar” for the unit. Now you can remove the needles and assemble the battery and attach the normal charging cable. Garmin have made tons of money selling replacement for fully functional batteries. Hope it helps someone!

    • xaeus says:

      Hello. Looks like your circuit has an over-discharge protection, which is normal for sensitive equipment. If some of the cells are in worse shape, they will over-discharge and you will have to apply the trick you mention (manual recharge) to use them again. Since the device used ICR18650-24B cells, you can replace them at any time with ICR18650-24F, which can be in plenty of supply on the market today. The 24F would be the fully compatible choice, but it’s highly likely that you can use higher capacities like ICR18650-26C or 26F. Those may not be as long lasting as the 24 series, though. From my years long testing, the most durable of cells were the 22 B and F series (which are of a little lower capacity, 2200mAh compared to 2400) but should resist a lot of years.

  70. Lars says:

    Thanks Xaeus!
    I am sure you are right about the over-discharge protection. What surprises me is that this happens to batteries the first year in use. My conclusion was that since it is “seasonal gear” on my latitudes (Scandinavia) the battery needs to be fully charged before put away for the winter. All the batteries I have done the trick on has been working normal after that. What is the over-discharge feature doing on the battery pack? If one would like to protect the unit from running on a to low voltage wouldn’t one put the low voltage watchdog in the unit…? Thank you very much for your suggestions! Any recommendations on EU web-shops for quality cells? Guess you are in Europe or Asia considering the time. /Lars

    • xaeus says:

      Li-ion does well in cold. A problem it would be to store them in too hot environment. I also store them fully charged, and I have plenty of cells that are 10 years + and still have full or near full capacity. The problem I noticed is in many newer cells. The overall quality decreased a lot starting with 2600mAh cells. If most of Samsungs, Sony and Sanyo 2200mAh cell are still fine after many years, for Samsungs there were big quality differences between the 2400mAh lots and I still did not find many 2600mAh worthy to keep on the long term.
      I cannot recommend shops because I get mine for various alternate sources. You should just be aware of fakes and take note that original cells cannot be excessively cheap.

      Over-discharge ‘annoyance’ can be happening per the full pack or per cell pair, depending on how the manufacturer wanted it. If you do change the cells, make sure there’s no tricky protection against that, like some of the power tools manufacturers use.

  71. Lars says:

    In this particular battery it is only 2 cells and the battery was purchased 2005. 13 yrs of use must be considered good…. Googled around but couldn’t find any recognized online source for the ICR18650-24F. What is the last letter (F or B on the original cells) indicating? Is it a letter for the generation of the cell model/type? I assume the cells we discuss doesn’t have any built in protection circuit? Any good or better alternative I can look for than the Samsung?

    For the general battery use in our house I bought a couple of dozen Eneloop and later some additional Fujitsu and a good MAHA charger. Haven’t bought a alkaline/NiMH battery in 8-10 yrs now. I charge them when discharged and stick them in the fridge.
    Imagine how much waste society could save if every one would do that. Thanks!

    • xaeus says:

      The letters generally represent the generations of the battery. I do see the supply is not as good as the last year, mostly because they now make higher capacities. Try finding 26Fs or 28A, maybe the supply is better.

  72. Bob says:

    I have a 6 X18650 cell battery pack, Black no markings on cells,any idea on who makes these cells and mil/amp ?

  73. Josh says:

    I have batteries that look almost identical to the Panasonic gray cells, except for some different markings on/under the wrapping. Can you ID?
    https://imgur.com/a/HWP2ee9

  74. Ceza Yi says:

    Hello,
    I have this 5 x 3.7V cell 18V pack. Each is a ICR18650 3.7V 1500mAh. One of the cells is dead but I can not find a 1500mAh spare locally and not willing to order from China. Can I replace it with a 2200mAh cell ? or with a INR18560 1500mAh cell ? wihout increasing risk too much

    So my options are either putting a 2200mAh ICR cell in or a 1500mAh INR cell in. Either possible ?

    Thanks

    • xaeus says:

      If you say they are ICRs, then you can use any 1500mAh good cell. If you put a 2200mAh one, there could be a load balancing problem when charging and discharging the pack. If that pack is from a power tool, it should use INRs. So in any case, it’s better to use a 1500mAh cell.

  75. Ceza Yi says:

    Thanks very much sir ! Yes it is a power tool pack but it had ICRs in it. So you say I better use an INR 1500mAh to go with the four functional ICRs in the pack.

    • xaeus says:

      I’d get 5 INRs and use the ICRs for other things like flashlights, but getting only 1 is the second best option.

  76. Chloe says:

    Hello there! I have some 18650’s out of a power bank. On the box it says “contains MINTAX Lithium-ion batteries” 2200mah. They are dark sky blue and have a white band around the top of the positive. The code on them (of which google finds nothing) is ZZNY-18650N1 K18A02 3.7V.
    Are you able to tell me anything about these please?

  77. Ceza Yi says:

    Thanks, thats what I thought too but wasn’t sure the charger circuitry would work with 5 INR’s + the amount of soldering involved 🙂

    • xaeus says:

      Charging is fine, the high power cells do not need more current when charging compared to standard ones. All my tests concluded that the current drawn when charging is nearly the same.

  78. Ceza Yi says:

    Thanks again, I’ll remember that. For now, I ordered couple of ICR 1500’s from China..I can survive with hand tools for a few weeks I guess.

  79. Florin Oniga says:

    Hi,

    Can you please help me identify this accumulator, I cannot find an equivalent one on the market:

    https://imgur.com/a/1yuIAee

    It is from an Electrolux Ergorapido vacuum (about 3 years old). In the last months it started to work fewer and fewer minutes (now it is dead), I suspect too many recharge cycles for the accumulators.

    Does the second row of text matter much? I found online batteries with LGDAHB31865 but not with the sub-code 0065C063A4 131.

    Thanks!

  80. berto says:

    Hi, could you help me figure out what batteries these are?
    I couldn’t find anything about them.
    Perhaps the ‘5C’ means it has a 5C rating, besides that I am stumped.

    Here are the links to my pictures:
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_MTMiWBDxgfU7GiOR0-Bp8_M5G_NfwUM
    https://drive.google.com/open?id=1hgFSjWJ1bDIPveFus0MJZ1qEbltzbxdn

    • xaeus says:

      If on the pack it says 8800mAh that would imply they are 2200mAh cells. The CJ marking is pretty universal, there are dozens of suppliers using it, so no conclusion from that. So if the battery has 4 pairs of 3 batteries in series, they certainly are 2200mAh. The original DV Samsung battery model has 4400mAh and uses 6 (2 pairs of 3) 2200mAh 22F or 22FM cells (similar in color to yours).
      So if you want to replace part of the cells, feel free to use Samsung 22s of any series. If you want to replace all of them, upgrade to 2600 mAhs (pink Samsungs 26Fs, G8 Sony, or anything else original) since they are pretty cheap now compared to a couple of years ago and you’d get 10400mAh (that’s 18% more capacity/uptime).

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